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Cannibalizing The Audience: How Studios Can Decrease Movie Piracy

How Studios Can Decrease Movie Piracy There’s a great line in the film adaptation of “Watchmen” that almost perfectly sums up my feelings on this issue. After revealing his plot to save the world, Adrian Veidt asks Dr. Manhattan if he understands why the most extreme measures had to be taken. His response, “without condoning or condemning… I understand.” Movie piracy is not a victimless crime. The more and more films are illegally shared and downloaded unquestionably has an adverse affect on the amount of movies that can be annually produced and may even be one of the major contributing factors as to why the divide between small films and giant tent-pole blockbusters is consistently growing. But without condoning or condemning, let’s try to understand the allure of pirating movies – which I submit to you, goes well beyond merely seeing the films for free. I sat in a movie[…]

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Dom’s Top Ten Films of 2014

10. The Babadook “The Babadook” was one of the biggest surprises I had at the theater this year. Going into this Australian indie with very little knowledge of it’s premise, I was roped in by it’s subtle intelligence and understated psychological horror. Essie Davis turns in a powerful performance as a widowed woman whose mind begins to unravel after unwisely reading “Mister Babadook” (the proverbial wolf in sheep’s clothing of children’s books) to her behaviorally challenged son. With shades of both Polanski’s “Repulsion” and Kubrick’s “The Shining,” this is a truly smart monster movie that plays out as a metaphor for the parental rage that you lock in the cellar and quietly feed in the dark. 9. Chef I took “Chef” to be Jon Favareu’s love letter to independent cinema. Having successfully graduated from low-budget filmmaking to mega-blockbusters, Favreau returns to form here in a small movie about a chef[…]

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Shooting with the BMPCC

When it comes to camera equipment, I’m a total sucker for a good deal. The Black Magic Pocket Cinema Camera (BMPCC) was already competitively priced when it was first released at the extremely affordable $999.95 price tag. So when Black Magic decided to slash the price to $500 for the month of July, I was all in. I had previously acquainted myself to all of the camera’s major drawbacks – limited ISO/white balance options, a touchscreen designed menu system without actual touchscreen functionality, absolutely atrocious battery life and generally being a beast when it comes to eating through SD Card memory (which has since been addressed in a recent firmware update by including several more options for Prores codecs.)  Most of these didn’t concern me so much, as there are basic workarounds for all of the above, but being an avid Canon shooter, I needed to know that I would[…]

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Thoughts on Kevin Smith’s, “Tusk”

(minor spoilers ahead) Let me state this right at the top – I cannot recommend “Tusk” to anyone. At the same time, I would never discourage you from seeing it. It’s a strange paradox of a film that is repellant and magnetic in equal measure and you need to know what you’re getting into before attending. The first act is a great set-up, the last two acts, a punchline. And the joke is on the audience. Remember this guy? Of course you do. All of us had a laugh at his expense. Kevin Smith remembers him too. There’s a not so subtle nod in the first few minutes of the movie to him (here, re-branded as the “Kill Bill Kid,” a hapless soul who accidentally cuts off his own leg of with a katana blade practicing swordplay in his garage.) His video goes viral and our lead character – Wallace[…]