Planet of Terror Interview

To anyone that will listen, I've been saying for the past two years or so that the horror genre is singlehandedly being carried by independent filmmakers. Challenging conventions while not adhering at all to your standard tropes, these fearless filmmakers are giving a much needed shot to the arm to a genre that is rife with unoriginal storytelling. These filmmakers, much like the one in today's featured interview, aren't at all afraid to take risks. And of course, they're here to scare the piss out of you.

To anyone that will listen, I’ve been saying for the past two years or so that the horror genre is singlehandedly being carried by independent filmmakers. Challenging conventions while not adhering at all to your standard tropes, these fearless filmmakers are giving a much needed shot to the arm to a genre that is rife with unoriginal storytelling. These filmmakers, much like the one in today’s featured interview, aren’t at all afraid to take risks. And of course, they’re here to scare the piss out of you. 

I recently had the opportunity to interview both writer/director Dom Portalla and actor Ken Flott who played the creeptastic neighbor, Mr. Reed. Here is what they had to say about the project, the difficulties independent filmmakers face nowadays, and Dom’s hair.

Cortez the Killer: How did the idea for The Darkness Within come about?

Dom Portalla: I had just finished making my first flick, ‘Duality’ which was basically my own version of film school. I’d spent a year working very closely with this amazing group of people who were both as equally passionate and inexperienced in filmmaking as I was. We all jumped in together and made this movie for just shy of $7,000, which was this bizarre, funny, oddball, gangster/comedy, mistaken identity story that when it was finished, felt very uneven. By the nature of filmmaking, you’re often shooting a movie out of succession (i.e., stuff in the middle is being shot first; the ending scene is filmed before the opener, so-on and so forth). So even though we were learning a lot and improving immensely as we went on, the final product (as much as I still love it) always felt slightly ‘off’. Knowing more about the filmmaking process and having way more technical experience, I was really eager to get back out there and make another flick. I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to do, but I knew that it would need to have some clearly set boundaries. We’d have to set it in a centralized location, we’d have to cap the budget at $3,000, and if possible, we needed to make it really fucking scary.

Please head over to http://www.planetofterror.com/2010/10/interview-dom-portalla-writerdirector.html to read rest of the interview.